Workshop Assignments

The Workshop module can be used in assignments where the students are set a task and they are required to submit work. The teacher specifies the task in the description of the workshop (typed into the HTML editor). The students are shown the task (together with the workshop's deadline, grade and specimen assessment form) when they go into the assignment. The students submit their work as text (typed into the HTML editor) together with one or more optional attachments. The student “submission” does not have to have an attachment. The attachment(s) are used only when the student is required to create work in an external file, for example a Word document or a PowerPoint presentation. The attachments are uploaded to a secure central area on the server running Moodle after being checked for viruses (if active).

Types of Assignment

The workshop module can be used to set up a variety of assignment types. The main types are shown in this table.

Options

1. Simple Assignment
[0]

2. Assignment with Self Assessment
[1]

3. Assignment with Examples
[1]

4. Assignment with Self Assessment and Examples
[1]

5. Assignment with Peer Assessments
[2]

6. Assignment with Self Assessment and Peer Assessments
[2]

7. Assignment with Examples and Peer Assessments
[2]

8. Assignment with Self Assessment, Examples and Peer Assessments
[2]

Self Assessment

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

Assessments of Examples

Zero

Zero

One or more

One or more

Zero

Zero

One or more

One or more

Assessment of Peer Submissions

Zero

Zero

Zero

Zero

One or more

One or more

One or more

One or more



[] gives “Workshop Type”. (0 is three phases with no grading grades, 1 is three phases with grading grades and 2 is five phases with grading grades.)

The Self Assessment option determines whether the student is asked to assess their own work once it has been submitted. This can help the students understand the assessment process. Having assessed their work they might want to amend it. This is allowed if actioned within the usual delay defined by Moodle. This is usually to set to 30 minutes.

The Assessment of Examples option relates to assignments where the teacher sets up a number of example “solutions” to the task. These are used

  1. to give the students an better idea of the task;

  2. to make the student aware on how their work will be assessed.

The teacher should assess these examples. The examples would normally range from good solutions to poor solutions so that the students can exercise their judgement in the assignment. The teacher decides on how many examples each student should grade. Three to five examples is the norm. With the examples graded by the teacher, the module can grade the student assessments. These “grading grades” can count towards the students final grade, if desired.

The Assessment of Peer Submissions option turns on the peer assessment feature in the module. The teacher can set the number of peer assessments each student is asked to do, that the number of pieces of work from other students they should assess. Normally this is the range three to five (again, although it is independent of the Assessment of Examples option). When each submission is assessed three or more times the module attempts to judge the assessments. This can result in some assessments being dropped and grading grades given to the other assessments. In that situation the teacher might feel that that is no need to assess all the submissions, but rather act as arbitrator on those submissions where the peer assessments are not in agreement. The teacher assessments can be weighted compared with the student assessments if required so that the teacher assessment dominate the grades given to the student submissions.

There are two other options which the teacher might use in certain circumstances.

The Re-submission option gives the students to option of re-submitting their work. With this option active, students can re-submit work once it has been assessed (by the teacher or, in the case of peer assessed assignments, by a student). Their grade for the assignment is then the grade from their best submission (plus their grade from their assessments, if included).

In the case of peer assessed assignments, there is a Agree Assessments option. This requires that each peer assessment should be agreed by the two students (the author and the assessor) before it is counted. This option should be used carefully and is probably only useful when the number of peer assessments each student is asked to do is very low, one or two. If used in the “normal” peer assessed assignment this option can allow the students to “cherry-pick” their best assessments.

This gives the module a range of about 20 different types of assignments.

Assessment Strategy

The assessment of the work is assessed is also flexible. There are five different types of Assessment Strategies. These are

So in theory that gives something like 100 different types of assignment.

Ray Kingdon
Sept 2004