Glossary of common terms


This glossary defines a number of words you will see used often in discussions about Moodle - you'll find them highlighted throughout this course.

If you wish to import this glossary to your Moodle site, you can download this file of exported entries: glossary_of_common_terms_20101214.xml.

Please feel free to add new words here!

Browse the glossary using this index

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | ALL

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C

Picture of Ian Darwin

C

by Ian Darwin - Tuesday, April 26, 2005, 4:21 PM
 
C is a medium-level programming language invented by Dennis Ritchie around 1973 at Bell Laboratories. Created to be the implementation language for the UNIX operating system, C went on to become one of the most widely-used programming languages worldwide in the 1980's, having been gradually supplanted for applications development both by its offspring C++ and Java and by scripting languages such as Perl, Python and PHP, the latter being the language that Moodle itself is written in.

Picture of Ken Wilson

Cache

by Ken Wilson - Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 1:06 AM
 
A small amount of memory between a slow process and a faster process which acts as a way of improving system performance. PHP caches are used to improve PHP performance.

Health & Safety Training Ninja

CGI

by Steve Bilton - Tuesday, November 6, 2007, 12:13 AM
 
Common Gateway Interface (CGI) is a standard for interfacing external applications with information servers, over HTTP and Web servers. A plain HTML document that the Web daemon retrieves is static, which means it exists in a constant state and will never change, basically this is simply a text file. A CGI program, on the other hand, is executed on-the-fly i.e. in real-time, so that it can output dynamic information. CMS - content management systems such as Moodle and Joomla are good examples of CGI and work using a combination PHP & CGI.



Matt Bury

constructionism

by Matt Bury - Friday, May 17, 2013, 3:42 PM
 

Constructionist learning is inspired by the constructivist theory that individual learners construct mental models to understand the world around them. However, constructionism holds that learning can happen most effectively when people are also active in making tangible objects in the real world. In this sense, constructionism is connected with experiential learning, and builds on Jean Piaget's epistemological theory of constructivism.

Seymour Papert defined constructionism in a proposal to the National Science Foundation entitled Constructionism: A New Opportunity for Elementary Science Education as follows: "The word constructionism is a mnemonic for two aspects of the theory of science education underlying this project. From constructivist theories of psychology we take a view of learning as a reconstruction rather than as a transmission of knowledge. Then we extend the idea of manipulative materials to the idea that learning is most effective when part of an activity the learner experiences as constructing a meaningful product."

Source: Wikipedia.org


Martin Dougiamas

constructivism

by Martin Dougiamas - Sunday, October 19, 2003, 12:55 PM
 
This point of view maintains that people actively construct new knowledge as they interact with their environment.

Everything you read, see, hear, feel, and touch is tested against your prior knowledge and if it is viable within your mental world, may form new knowledge you carry with you. Knowledge is strengthened if you can use it successfully in your wider environment. You are not just a memory bank passively absorbing information, nor can knowledge be "transmitted" to you just by reading something or listening to someone.

This is not to say you can't learn anything from reading a web page or watching a lecture, obviously you can, it's just pointing out that there is more interpretation going on than a transfer of information from one brain to another.

Think I am older now :)

context

by Chris Collman - Monday, July 8, 2019, 7:56 PM
 

In Moodle, the term "context" may have a specific meaning.

A Moodle context is a place where permissions are assigned to a user (usually through a role).  In Moodle, contexts are layered in a hierachry.  Some examples: a site is the overall context; each course category is a context in the site; each course is a context in it's course category; each topic/section is a context and the resources and activities in a topic/section are contexts.   Blocks, filters and special pages are contexts that are at minimum part of the  site context.    Permissions are passed down automatically. For example, a user who has a teacher role in a course will be assigned that role when a Forum context is created.   Roles for individuals or groups can be changed in a context. This makes it possible for one user to be a teacher in one context and  a student in another. 


Picture of Simon Pavitt

CPanel

by Simon Pavitt - Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 6:51 AM
 
Many webhosting companies provide CPanel (short for Control Panel) as a convenient, graphical menu system which allow users to administer their own webspace.

For more information go to:
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cpanel]


Picture of Jason Grey

Cron

by Jason Grey - Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 12:44 PM
 

Cron is an Automatic sytem in moodle that sends out messages to the system through.

  • EMail
  • Rss
  • Assignement Uploads  (This is normally for the teachers - for notifications that a student has uploaded an assignment).

For more information on Cron check the moodle docs page and your help section in moodle.

Happy Moodleing.


Picture of Jurgis Pralgauskis

CSCL

by Jurgis Pralgauskis - Tuesday, November 1, 2005, 8:33 AM
 
Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.
It has much to do with internet and social constructivism ;)

Martin Dougiamas

CSS

by Martin Dougiamas - Wednesday, October 1, 2003, 2:14 PM
 
Abbreviation for "Cascading Style Sheets". CSS defines styles and colours and how they should be applied to a web page.


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