Glossary of common terms


This glossary defines a number of words you will see used often in discussions about Moodle - you'll find them highlighted throughout this course.

If you wish to import this glossary to your Moodle site, you can download this file of exported entries: glossary_of_common_terms_20101214.xml.

Please feel free to add new words here!

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COMPUTING TERMS

Shibboleth

by Lukas Haemmerle - Saturday, July 2, 2005, 1:29 AM
 
Shibboleth is not only a kind of linguistic password that identifies one as a member of an 'in' group, it's also the name of a middleware project of Internet2.

The Shibboleth project is developing architectures, policy structures, practical technologies and an open source implementation (also called Shibboleth) to support inter-institutional sharing of (web) resources subject to access controls.

Some key concepts of Shibboleth are:
  • Federated Administration
  • Access Control Based on Attributes
  • Active Management of Privacy
  • Standards Based
  • Framework for Multiple, Scaleable Trust and Policy Sets (Federations)
  • Standard Attribute Value Vocabulary
Using Moodle with Shibboleth authentication has the following advantages (depending on the Shibboleth federation you are part of):
  • Access to Moodle can be restricted very accurate (e.g. you allow only students from universities A, B and D to access your Moodle, but not students from universities C and E. Or you allow only medicine students.)
  • User accounts are created automatically as soon as a user logs in the first time.
  • The user profiles are set up automatically (e.g. the users firstname, surname and email address is inserted the first time a user logs in)
  • The user profiles can automatically kept up-to date all the time
  • So you don't have to care anymore for user management issues because this is basically handled by the Identity Provider of the Shibboleth user (e.g. the home university).
  • Once Shibboleth users are authenticated, they can access other Shibboleth-enabled resources without loggin in another time. Due to this single sign-on mechanism, they e.g. can jump from one Moodle installation to another or the can access a Shibboleth-protected library or a web shop, always being authenticated.
Plans for the future concerning Moodle:
  • Automatic course enrollment according to Shibboleth attributes.


Martin Dougiamas

SMTP

by Martin Dougiamas - Wednesday, October 1, 2003, 4:57 PM
 
Short for Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, a protocol for sending e-mail messages between servers. Most e-mail systems that send mail over the Internet use SMTP to send messages from one server to another. In addition, SMTP is generally used to send messages from a mail client (or a program like Moodle) to a mail server.

SOP

by Sakshi Goel - Tuesday, July 9, 2013, 3:19 PM
 

Standard Operating Procedure.


Art Lader

spam

by Art Lader - Sunday, May 15, 2005, 12:32 PM
 
Electronic junk mail or junk newsgroup postings. Some people define spam even more generally as any unsolicited e-mail. However, if a long-lost brother finds your e-mail address and sends you a message, this could hardly be called spam, even though it's unsolicited. Real spam is generally e-mail advertising for some product sent to a mailing list or newsgroup.
In addition to wasting people's time with unwanted e-mail, spam also eats up a lot of network bandwidth. Consequently, there are many organizations, as well as individuals, who have taken it upon themselves to fight spam with a variety of techniques. But because the Internet is public, there is really little that can be done to prevent spam, just as it is impossible to prevent junk mail. However, some online services have instituted policies to prevent spammers from spamming their subscribers.

There is some debate about the source of the term, but the generally accepted version is that it comes from the Monty Python song, "Spam spam spam spam, spam spam spam spam, lovely spam, wonderful spam" Like the song, spam is an endless repetition of worthless text. Another school of thought maintains that it comes from the computer group lab at the University of Southern California who gave it the name because it has many of the same characteristics as the lunchmeat Spam:

Nobody wants it or ever asks for it.
No one ever eats it; it is the first item to be pushed to the side when eating the entree.
Sometimes it is actually tasty, like 1% of junk mail that is really useful to some people.

source

SQL

by Markus Ebenhoeh - Saturday, July 5, 2008, 5:29 AM
 
short for 'Structured Query Language'


(I entered this entry only because a forum search for 'firebird' also brought up ALL the entries that included 'sql' even as a substring as e.g. in 'mysqladmin'.)



Hi!

SVG

by Waldeck Schutzer - Friday, September 25, 2009, 3:17 PM
 

SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) is a markup language based on XML for representing two-dimensional vector graphics. It allows for both static and dynamic graphics. Vector graphics usually perform better when compared to raster formats like JPEG, PNG or GIF, and can be rescaled arbitrarily without loss of quality, and the rescaling does not imply a larger digital footprint. Thus, for instance, the graphics for printing an entire outdoor picture could fit in just a couple megabytes of disk space (the same as a good cellphone picture) without loosing its quality.

SVG can also be used to represent text where the required fonts are unavailable, by converting each individual character to a set of graphical paths. It can also be used to represent other types of content like mathematical formulas,

Some web browsers have native (but incomplete) support for SVG. The list includes browsers based on the gecko engine (Firefox, Netscape, Camino, Epiphany, and SeaMonkey), browsers based on the webkit engine (Safari, Chrome, OmniWeb), Opera and Amaya. On the other hand, browsers based on the MSHTML engine (Internet Explorer, Wikibrowse, Maxthon, and NetCaptor) do not provide support for SVG.

References

  1. The W3C recommendation on SVG.
  2. SVG on Wikipedia.

TIA

by Darren Smith - Monday, May 2, 2005, 3:59 AM
 

This is an abbreviation for 'Thanks in advance'

Often used in usenet but has become increasingly popular in e-mails, text messages, instant messages, chat rooms and forum posts. In fact, you could come across this abbreviation in any modern electronic communication.


UNIX

by Ian Darwin - Friday, March 4, 2005, 6:19 AM
 
UNIX is a computer operating system that originated around 1970 at Bell Laboratories and has been in continuous use and development since.
Linux is a rewrite of UNIX, whereas FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD, Mac OS X and Solaris, among others, are descendants of the original UNIX implementation.

Today UNIX and Linux run the majority of servers and other "infrastructure" on the Internet, but is also used on a lot of desktop systems (including Mac OS X, the #2 best-selling commercial operating system in the world).

Martin Dougiamas

upload

by Martin Dougiamas - Wednesday, October 1, 2003, 2:19 PM
 
To move your files from a personal computer "up" to a server. Also see FTP and download.

Martin Dougiamas

URL

by Martin Dougiamas - Monday, November 3, 2003, 1:04 AM
 

A Uniform Resource Locator is the address that is used to reach a website. For example, http://moodle.org/


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