Glossary of common terms


This glossary defines a number of words you will see used often in discussions about Moodle - you'll find them highlighted throughout this course.

If you wish to import this glossary to your Moodle site, you can download this file of exported entries: glossary_of_common_terms_20101214.xml.

Please feel free to add new words here!

Browse the glossary using this index

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Currently sorted First name ascending Sort by: Last name | First name change to descending

slightly edited copy of http://xkcd.com/358/

Alan Trick

slightly edited copy of http://xkcd.com/358/

HIG

by Alan Trick - Tuesday, June 30, 2009, 9:42 PM
 
Human Interface Guidelines

See the wikipedia article.

Picture of Amy Lock

Amy Lock

Picture of Amy Lock

VET

by Amy Lock - Wednesday, February 7, 2018, 3:26 PM
 

Vocational Education and Training. 


This is a term used in Australia to refer to programs that are aimed at trades or skills-based vocations. For example, an electrician would undertake a VET course in order to become an electrician and would learn the skills during the process, but a lawyer would not. VET courses can be delivered through schools, universities, TAFEs (Technical and Further Education providers) or RTOs (Registered Training Organisations). 

VET courses can start from Cert I (basic skills) and go all the way up to Advanced Diploma level. (The order goes Cert I, Cert II, Cert III, Cert IV, Diploma, Advanced Diploma) 


Picture of Andrew McMillan

Andrew McMillan

Picture of Andrew McMillan

PostgreSQL

by Andrew McMillan - Wednesday, November 24, 2004, 4:56 PM
 
PostgreSQL is a full-featured open-source database with many enterprise features, including:
  • Support for database transactions
  • Strong support for SQL-92 standard
  • Native external interfaces for ODBC, JDBC, C, C++, PHP, Perl, TCL, Python and Ruby
  • Referential integrity
  • Internal functions can be written in C, C++, Java, Perl, TCL, Python, Ruby, PHP and PL/PgSQL
  • Insert/Update/Delete Triggers
  • Inheritance
  • Unicode
  • Extensible data types
  • Indexes on functions
PostgreSQL scales well into large multi-user environments, where the application has significantly intermixed reading and writing activity.

See http://www.postgresql.org/ for more information.

Art Lader

Art Lader

Art Lader

flame

by Art Lader - Friday, August 31, 2007, 12:34 AM
 

(n.) A searing e-mail or newsgroup message in which the writer attacks another participant in overly harsh, and often personal, terms. Flames are an unfortunate, but inevitable, element of unmoderated conferences.

(v.) To post a flame.

source


Art Lader

spam

by Art Lader - Sunday, May 15, 2005, 12:32 PM
 
Electronic junk mail or junk newsgroup postings. Some people define spam even more generally as any unsolicited e-mail. However, if a long-lost brother finds your e-mail address and sends you a message, this could hardly be called spam, even though it's unsolicited. Real spam is generally e-mail advertising for some product sent to a mailing list or newsgroup.
In addition to wasting people's time with unwanted e-mail, spam also eats up a lot of network bandwidth. Consequently, there are many organizations, as well as individuals, who have taken it upon themselves to fight spam with a variety of techniques. But because the Internet is public, there is really little that can be done to prevent spam, just as it is impossible to prevent junk mail. However, some online services have instituted policies to prevent spammers from spamming their subscribers.

There is some debate about the source of the term, but the generally accepted version is that it comes from the Monty Python song, "Spam spam spam spam, spam spam spam spam, lovely spam, wonderful spam" Like the song, spam is an endless repetition of worthless text. Another school of thought maintains that it comes from the computer group lab at the University of Southern California who gave it the name because it has many of the same characteristics as the lunchmeat Spam:

Nobody wants it or ever asks for it.
No one ever eats it; it is the first item to be pushed to the side when eating the entree.
Sometimes it is actually tasty, like 1% of junk mail that is really useful to some people.

source