Quiz

 
 
Picture of Andre Mount
Multianswer multiple choice
 

Hi! I'm trying to set up a quiz for an assignment that was on paper in a previous incarnation. The assignment is for a music theory class.

For one of the questions, I'd like students to identify all of the different pitches in a given passage. I would like to set this up like a multiple choice question in which students select certain pitches out of the full collection of twelve.

In other words, the possible answers (separated by commas) are:

C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb, E, F, F#/Gb, G, G#/Ab, A, A#/Bb, B

The answer to the question might be something like:

C, D, E, F, G, A, B

In this case, I would want students to select all seven correct answers for full credit. I would also like them to be penalized for selecting incorrect options (to avoid the potential for them to exploit the system by simply selecting all of the options).

I know this sort of thing can be done with the multiple choice question type, but here's the problem. Since there are seven equally-correct answers, each one should be worth approximately 14.29% (100/7) of the grade for that question. (The penalty for the five wrong answers in this case is more straightforward: 100/5 = 20.)

Is there any way around the set values for multiple choice options? I've seen other posts asking if multianswer questions like this are possible in cloze (here), but I'm wondering if anyone has ideas about how I can do this. Right now it looks like the best solution is to simply format the question as an essay and grade it manually.

Thanks!

 
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Picture of Tzvi Daum
Re: Multianswer multiple choice
 

Andre,

Actually, each correct answer would be worth 14.28571% and that IS an option in the drop down menu for multiple choice questions.

Meaning, you need to select "multiple answers allowed" and then select the grade option of "14.28571%" next to each correct answer.

You can also import your questions (e.g. Moodle XML format) which will work as well, but again make sure you use seven decimals as above or Moodle won't like it.

In terms of the penalties I tried it and it works as well. You can assign -%20 or -14.28571% as you wish. If the system gives you a hard time with it not being equal to 100% (which I don't think it will) - give zero to each wrong answer and then edit the question to adjust the penalties which is what I did.

Tzvi

 
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Picture of Andre Mount
Re: Multianswer multiple choice
 

Thanks for the response, Tzvi! Yes, I see now that the percentage I needed was in the drop down menu. I don't know why I didn't see it! 

But let's say there were 11 correct answers. (I'm pretty sure I don't see 9.0909091% on the menu!) Is that something I could accomplish with importing a Moodle XML formatted question? I'll have to look into that. I didn't realize that was an option that would give me more flexibility.

Thanks!

 
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Picture of Tzvi Daum
Re: Multianswer multiple choice
 

Andre,

You are right about their not being an option for  eleven out of twelve. I tried importing giving each correct question a value of 9.0909090 and it didn't work, I tried adding another 9 at the end and that did not work, I even added a 0.0000001 at the end of the wrong answer so it should equal exactly a hundred and that did not work either. The only thing I could do was choose the option of not stopping the import on wrong grade and using the nearest one selected which in this case was 10%. I guess you cannot import a question value if there is not match for it on the drop down menu. It would seem that you either need to avoid 11/12.

It was an interesting experiment.

 

Tzvi

 
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Tim at Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary
Re: Multianswer multiple choice
Group DevelopersGroup Documentation writersGroup Particularly helpful Moodlers

I think the best way to do this question would be using one of our drag-and-drop question types. One of

You could have draggable labels C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb, E, F, F#/Gb, G, G#/Ab, A, A#/Bb, B, which the student would drag to underneath each note.

Alternatively you could do this as a standard matching question. Number the notes in the score that you want the students to identify, and then make them match the numbers to the note names. (You can have a matching question where there are 5 sub-questions and 12 possible choices.)

 

 
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Picture of Andre Mount
Re: Multianswer multiple choice
 

Thanks for the suggestion, Tim. I haven't used the drag-and-drop questions before. Learning this ought to give me a great new way to procrastinate!

 
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