Teaching with Moodle

 
 
Picture of Jean Michel
Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

Hi community!

I am working to have Moodle in an important school with many users.  Last two weeks we did a first test to see what teachers think about it by using it while teaching home classroom. 

Result: Teachers just DON'T LIKE it. They consider it's difficult to use, not user-friendly and even, irritating to work with Moodle.

Believe me: I give them many lessons before start. I explained them a lot about the Moodle philosophy. I did all I had in my hand to try to persuade them Moodle is great, but I fail...

What I can tell them? What I can do?

P.D.-If a miracle does not save me, I think head teacher is going to change his mind about Moodle and he will select another platform. sad

 
Average of ratings: -
Mary Cooch
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Documentation writersGroup Moodle Course Creator Certificate holdersGroup Moodle HQGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup TestersGroup Translators

Ok well first of all - what did you show them/do with them in your "many lessons"? A few suggestions although it might be too late:

  1. Do as much of the admin for them as you can - creating empty course/adding users. They don't need to have to think of this as well as the work they will create inside the courses.
  2. make them believe it will save them time in the long term  - anything that saves time will be met with interest (even if it might not be true wink)
  3. Show them quick easy stuff like setting up a forum or adding a "page". These are "quick fixes" that can get good results: a  couple of minutes setting up a forum (with a good discussion topic) can generate  a lot of responses from students. "Minimum input for maximum output"
  4. If they are keen to upload their documents, show them the drag and drop option with Chrome/Firefox (I assume you are testing Moodle 2.3?) This is something I have found will encourage even the most unenthusiastic of teachers, except they will need to understand there is more than just one browser Internet Explorer.
  5. I will let others continuesmile
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Jean Michel
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

Hi Mary. I'm in 2.2 versionm, so no drag & drop yet.

Well, In my "lessons" I only explained them how they can create the courses. No admin work at all. So, I explained them all the resources & activity types with live examples.

As you commented I tried to convice them they are going to save time, but they told me the contrary after using it by their own. They told me that creating a lesson for example is not user-friendly. They are confused by all the concepts that are in it (clusters, branches, content pages, ...).  In their opinion, it's not the teacher language. They think I should not have to explain them what is a cluster in order to be able to create a lesson for their students.

That's was only an example. There are many like this with other type of activities or resources.  I don't want to tell them there are millions of users using Moodle because I don't want them to believe I'm telling they are clumsy or silly.

 

Thanks for your help. The decision of using Moodle is going to be made by next week. I will cross my fingers smile

 
Average of ratings: -
Mary Cooch
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Documentation writersGroup Moodle Course Creator Certificate holdersGroup Moodle HQGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup TestersGroup Translators
Oh dear sad I think perhaps starting them off creating a "lesson" was not the best of ideas because that is an Advanced feature. When I train teachers I only show them how to make lessons when they have been using Moodle for quite a long time. I think it is best to start simple and only use some of the features - forum/page/URL and even assignment because that isn't difficult. With those three or four features you can go a long way. As well as uploading their resources, which is in fact quite difficult.
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Marcus Green
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

What are they using at the moment?

I am total geek and despite the potential benefits I find the Lesson module to be too much like hard work, so that may not have given them a good initial experience.

You need to identify a fairly easy to learn significant benefit of any new technology to pursuade people to climb the learning curve.

 

 

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Rob Johnson
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

I agree with Marcus about the lesson module.  You might get more mileage out of assignment.  If your teachers are currently having students submit files via email, assignment will be a tool they will like.  It makes managing submissions and feedback much more streamlined.  They will see where they can save time.

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of al tobing
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

What I did to help teachers get along with moodle was, like Mary's no.1 suggesstion, help them as much as I could, starting in admin areas but also a kick starter such as this:

 

1. All teachers must have a lesson plan for the whole year or semester, right? I would ask them to gather all the materials needed just for couple weeks of those lesson plan.

 

2. I then, upload all those documents, movies, presentation (we call it resource in moodle) and put it in order just as how teacher would do in class. And then I let the teacher see how students can see the course. ( at this point they are usually very happy about it)

 

3. And then I ask again whether the teacher wants to give assignment to students. No teacher would say no to this question right? smile So, I create a simple assignment such as online text and upload files. And ofcourse show it to this teacher, how later it can be graded, commented, and showed. The teacher usually has little doubts whether student will be able to participate in this course. But the teacher usually willing to try after I said that students are generally fast learners, and when it comes to mouse pointing and clicking, oh boy they are like ferari.

 

4. I told all of my teachers to come to me anytime during working hours should they experience any trouble with moodle, and I will walkthrough the process of solving the problem, which is never too difficult for teachers.

 

5. Some teachers learn so fast, but some others doesn't even care. Luckily my principal decided to use moodle forum for teacher as the only information and distribution channel among teachers, so all teacher must every day log in and participate at least in teacher's forum.

 

Hope this helps big grin

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Tonya Riney
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 
Hi Jean, As with all "sales" conquests, if you don't demonstrate to the customer "what is in it for them," you won't make the sale. Teachers typically don't want to learn new technologies - they have enough on their plates just trying to teach. Adding a layer of technology makes the process much more difficult on the front end - but oh, so much easier on the back end. SO. MUCH. EASIER. You must present Moodle in this framework. Best, Tonya
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Vicke Denniston
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

I am in the middle of a transition and went through the sales process last Spring term. Talk about the cool features.

1 students really like being able to find everything on the front page

2. The gradebook. This is especially good if you are moving from Blackboard, because unlike Bb, the Moodle gradebook can do arithmetic, but go slow, start with a manually created gradebook.

3. Show simple activities, uploading of files, forums. I have been running workshops for faculty since May, and won't even consider the lesson activity until after January, only as a gee whiz for coming attractions.

As Mary said, do as much admin as you can to start, more work for you, but ease them into that side of it. Show them why you like it, but not by saying how much it will be easier for you. I made that mistake and got my ears pinned back for my trouble. Talk about how it will be easier for them. And be patient, willing to explain the same thing over and over and over.....

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Edward Burke
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

I agree with everything said so far.  When I first trained our teachers, it was in a computer lab, I set up course shells for everyone present ahead of time, I passed around a "stick" with sample files for those who did not bring their own documents, and then I did an upload demos and had them repeat it, answering their questions as we went.  I polled those present as to their GB scenarios (most were Weighted GB with Simple Weighted categories) and demonstrated how the GB takes all the misery out of grading.  I only covered adding resources (labels & files) and the GB and left other functions for another day.  In the end most were pleased with the functions of Moodle, confident in loading basic documents and "customizing their settings,  and not overwhelmed with the "bells & whistles".  The response was positive, and now 3yrs later most of our faculty are competent iusers, having picked up other parts of Moodle as they needed them to make their teaching life easier.  Hope this helps

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Toni Soto
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

Hello all,

I agree with previous comments about the difficult of Moodle lessons for beginners.

I'm not sure if it's a good idea 'to force' all teachers to use Moodle. Not all teachers have IT competences and not all of them will take advantage of using Moodle for their lessons.  Additionally some teachers are near retirement and they feel themselves too old to change their teaching styles.

So, my suggestions is to present Moodle to the staff as 'an arrival point' instead of a 'destination point'. When I presented Moodle to my headmaster some years ago I asked her for never forcing teachers to use Moodle if they didn't like it. I had already know (more or less) how many teachers were going to be involved and how many would refuse it at the beguinning. So, I'd suggest you to focus your attention and efforts giving support to those who will appreciate the benefits of using Moodle. The goal would be creating some kind of 'innovative teachers' and don't care (iniatilly) too much about those who are not ready to join moodle. 

Headmasters usually love the idea of 'creative groups' or 'innovative groups' of teachers exploring new ways of teaching, so Moodle can be an amazing tool for innovation.

If you succeed in creating a group of 'Moodle pionners', for sure that Moodle will be spread slowly throughout your School. An attitude of 'open arms' and 'friendly support' to new teachers who begin to approach a moodle is, IMHO the key for succeed.

Be patient and, instead of calling your teachers to come to Moodle, let their curiosity to bring them to Moodle.

I hope that your headmaster doesn't take the wrong decission mixed

Good luck and best regards from Spain,

 

Toni

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Jean Michel
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 
Hi all again. Thanks a lot for your great support! I would like to clear up that I have had strict requirements given by the real world: -The important one: time. It's very reasonable what many of you propose: a slow adoption by teachers increasing difficulty tasks step by step. To do that we needed having plenty of time to do it in a long process. I wish I could!. I had two weeks. Teachers had limited time because they are doing their work as well and we can not force to stop their daily hard work. We had to do some magic to find gaps in order to teachers could train and learn Moodle. This is a very common scenario in real world, I think. - Second: no chosen one 'users'. Several of you have told me to "choose" or "select" appropiate teachers witch a tech profile. I can't. I was given a subset of teachers selected by head teacher because they had a flexible agenda and they could participate in our pilot experiment. I told the principal teacher that it could be a problem, but he said to me: "It should not be a problem. Moodle should be learnt by all teachers without problems if it is as cool as you told me. You should only introduce them in the platform and they should be able to learn by themselves the platform. Does anybody told you how to use some of the more important online tools as 'Facebook' or 'Google'. No. Why? Because they are really easy!! That's I want with this platform" Last. Many of you told me lessons should be left to the last. Ok. I did that. I started with lighter tasks (online assignments, upload files) and the last we did was lessons. Consider I was told to introduce them in the main tasks they will use. I consider lessons can be very useful for them, so I introduced them in lessons concepts, and how to use it. But the reaction was ... wow! it's really difficult to do that! How much time I should spend to create a good lesson for my students! I'll let you know the final decision when I know it. I'll try to use your recommendations as much as possible to try to have Moodle in the college. It's my goal!!. Regards!
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Marcus Green
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers
Some of your problems may be reflected in the way you have asked your questions here.
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Visvanath Ratnaweera
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers
Hi Jean

You wrote:
> I had two weeks. Teachers had limited time because they are doing their work as well and we can not force to stop their daily hard work. We had to do some magic to find gaps in order to teachers could train and learn Moodle. This is a very common scenario in real world, I think. - Second: no chosen one 'users'. Several of you have told me to "choose" or "select" appropiate teachers witch a tech profile. I can't. I was given a subset of teachers selected by head teacher because they had a flexible agenda and they could participate in our pilot experiment.

So it was an order from the head teacher?

> I told the principal teacher that it could be a problem, but he said to me: "It should not be a problem. Moodle should be learnt by all teachers without problems if it is as cool as you told me. You should only introduce them in the platform and they should be able to learn by themselves the platform. Does anybody told you how to use some of the more important online tools as 'Facebook' or 'Google'. No. Why? Because they are really easy!! That's I want with this platform"

For that "head" Facebook and Google are "the more important online tools"? (For doing what?)

Call yourself lucky, you escaped unharmed!
sad

@Mod, I think this discussion fits better to either "Comparison and Advocacy" or "Teaching Strategies" or "Moodle stories". "General Problems" is more technical.
 
Average of ratings: -
Just wondering . . .
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

Hey Jean, I'm not sure this is the "Real World"

It sounds more like artifically created situation from Management decisions.  To give two weeks for this, NO extra resources (etc) . . sounds a bit like  . . .  (I won't fill in the gaps here, this is a public forum)

But I know this sort of comment will not help you.  But go well, even if the Pilot finishes and they decide to choose something else (or nothing), it's not the end of the world.

In my part of the world they refer to trying to create movement in education as much like trying to shift a graveyard.  There have been comments here and questions like "Why in particular are you doing this?" and WIIFM? - questions like this are important in any pilot.

-Derek

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Ralf Hilgenstock
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group DevelopersGroup Translators

Hi Jean,

I'm stumbling about one sentence in your post:

"But the reaction was ... wow! it's really difficult to do that! How much time I should spend to create a good lesson for my students! I'll let you know the final decision when I know it."

I've given a lot of lessons for teachers in different environments and there is a common fault in awareness of effort:

They don't make  a difference between preparing the content for a lesson, adding the material into Moodle and supporting the learners.

If the lesson is prepared, content (text, pics), order, paths, then its really simple to put it into a lesson activity.  If the topic for the lesson and the learning process and progression aren't designed, if the stuff for the lesson is not researched or selected its a lot of work. But exactly the same workload is required for a classroom lesson.

You're running into the same discussion with creating quizzes.  If the questions are prepared, if the answers are written, its not a problem to select the question type and put all of them into the form. If I'm starting to think about my question during editing it needs a lot of time to edit a question. But most of the time I'm thinking about question texts and answers.
I also found that lots of teachers think about grading strategies and feedback when they grade the paper based tests from students. In Moodle they have to do it before the quiz is published for learners. Here they often see the work before students take the quiz, but they dont add the time for corrections of paper based tests.

If we present Moodle to newcomers experienced with other tools, they tell me: Oh. Moodle is intutive and nearly self explaining. Moodle is much easier to use than other tools we are working with. Moodle is flexible if the learning process changes.

By the way: I see a lot of usability issues within Moodle and at tracker you'll find  masses as suggestions to optimize Moodle written by me. 

Sometimes my questions are:  Did you ever try to organize a school with 500 students, 45 teachers, and more than hundredfifty classes in Facebook? How can you grade assignments in Facebook? How to create a lesson, a quiz in Facebook? What  about copyright protected content in Facebook?

The resistance in Moodle train-the-teacher courses often has other reasons than the tool. Here are some of them:

  • I'm experienced with classical lessons, I don't know how my students react about the new tools. I don't want to change any of my methods and strategies. Teachers are very conservative in teaching style.
  • I've prepared materials and lessons for most of the teaching issues. I've to re-edit and transfer all of them into a new media. That needs a lot of time.
  • Will I lose my job if we are teaching online. Or will they reduce the number of lessons I'm paid for.
  • Its  again one of these new ideas that are coming and going again after short time.

Learning and teaching systems are the systems  that are changing strategies and behaviour of the key actors very slowly. Much slower than big companies and also slower than governmental organizations.  Introducing Moodle as the first online tool is part of a change process. But often its implemented  like a new schoolbook or a new version of MS Office.

Ralf Hilgenstock (trainer for team development, leadership, coach and organizational development) German moodle partner.

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Visvanath Ratnaweera
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers
Why do these teachers need Moodle, or a LMS for that matter?
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Dave Trevena
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 
I have been using Moodle for over 10 years now, I think we have forgotten some of the original ethos of what Moodle was about, and this will help sell to your staff. Moodle is now all singing, all dancing, and possibly too complex for a non IT friendly teacher to grasp at first glance. But push the fact that it is there to support the learner and not replace the tutor... a student who has missed a session or 2 through illness or injury can catch up in their own time at their own pace....a student who had difficulty grasping concepts can revisit the learning materials to underpin their knowledge at their own pace... a student with SpLD can change the font colour and size, background colour, use a screen reader, screen tinter, reading ruler, etc, etc, so there is no way of being disadvantaged through disability discrimination. So get back to basics, remember your staff in so many cases have the same learning style as their students, and will have to be nurtured not blinded with science.
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Jeremy Meades
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

Wow Jean Michel! I think your Head has set some unrealistic expectations to 'prove' the value of Moodle in teaching and learning.

I agree with much of what has been said but I have something to add. It's true that teachers being introduced to Moodle need examples of time-saving, etc. to support the 'what's in it for me (WIIFM) argument but there is another more important aspect that needs to be addressed IMHO.

Teachers presented with Moodle for the first time are often desperately trying to make a connection between their classroom practice (that is what they know) and the Moodle skill set that is being demonstrated - often there is a huge gap. The result is that first impressions find Moodle complicated and difficult and those impressions will be compounded by time pressures making the situation worse.

An approach to first timers which I have found works quite well is to give examples of where classroom practice is improved and enhanced by the use of Moodle.

Here's an example.

Biology teacher teaching an advanced level course to a group of students sets a series of essay questions about six weeks before the exam as part of exam preparation. Each student prepares an essay plan which the teacher comments upon and gives feedback. Each student then writes the essay and the teacher marks the essay with feedback. The problem with this approach is that the teacher has to mark each essay plan, mark each essay and the students only experience their own essay plan and essay.

The Moodle approach - We setup a forum in Moodle. A discussion topic was created for each essay title. Each student was asked to pick an essay title and in a reply to the discussion topic write their essay plan. The other students and the teacher then commented upon each essay plan by replying to the essay plan in the forum so that each student received feedback from peers and the teacher.

The teacher then gave direction about how the exam board would mark essays and the criteria they would use. Students were then asked to pick an essay plan (not the one they had created) and to write an essay based upon that plan. This was done as a reply to the essay plan in the forum. All students were then asked to mark the essays using the criteria the teacher had discussed previously and put their marks and feedback into replies to the essay reply.

The result?

Teacher did not have to mark any essay plans, only contribute to the discussion about them in the forum. Teacher did not have to mark any essays, only contribute to the discussion about marking. Teacher only had to provide information about the marking criteria.

Not only was this a time saver, it was also an effective and imaginative use of a forum in Moodle. Also, if the teacher had wanted to they could provide their own grades through marking forum posts.

 
Average of ratings: -
Just wondering . . .
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

@Jeremy, great post.

My experience is that it takes time to go from Cool tools that Moodle has to course designs.  Like hours.

I'm now experimenting with a different approach.  Simple aims with a course (and I actually have five suggested ones) and then look at a design in Moodle using just a few tools.

Secondly, I find some teachers slow to "get it", and one of the common reasons is they have NO idea what it is like from a student point of view. A short experience of Moodle goes a long way.  A good experience of Moodle (say in some PG study somewhere) is really good.  A lousy course somewhere (like as in Jeremy's initial model for Biology, or worse) takes some time to undo.

Third comment: Habits are critical.  Regular posts in the forum to keep things ticking over (like a weekly catchup), keeping all core docs on the site so you never have to hand out an extra again, providing extension work, answers, groups, monitoring students via logs, have a warmup activity (etc).  

I feel like screaming when I see tutors in Moodle posting "If you have any questions about the assignment send me an e-mail".

Fourth comment: I have my own personal Moodle taxonomy of difficulty.

  • I have never taken workshops on Lessons until people have done at least a term on simpler tools.
  • I hire slave labour to sort out groups if this needs to be done quickly.  (Groups already set up are easier to learn from).
  • I tackle assignments with a trail run for students first.  I try to avoid assignment + groups + gradebook in one go.
  • Quizzes: I hire slave labout for the first few questions, then go from there.  This FORCES teachers to write their questions first.  They THEY sit the quizzes.  Then we go.  smile

This does not sound like a pilot.  A pilot is usually measured, opt in, quick feedback, on course corrections etc.  

Good luck Jean.  We may be able to help more if there were some very specific elements of feedback from the teachers.  They may be designing in an unhelpful and inefficient way.  You can make a lot of work for yourself in Moodle with poor design, especially with no access to a good repository, or no extra plugins/formats/themes added.

Rambling over.

-Derek

 
Average of ratings: -
Mary Cooch
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Documentation writersGroup Moodle Course Creator Certificate holdersGroup Moodle HQGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup TestersGroup Translators
I think following Visvanath's suggestion I might move this to the Teaching strategies forum as we're getting nicely into -er - teaching strategies albeit for teaching teachers here. I will leave it for a while however to make sure you all see this notice and don't wonder where the whole discussion has disappeared to smile
 
Average of ratings: -
Mary Cooch
How best to introduce teachers to Moodle (WAS Moodle test pilot failure)
Group Documentation writersGroup Moodle Course Creator Certificate holdersGroup Moodle HQGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup TestersGroup Translators

And maybe now we are on the positive constructive a subject title change might be in order toosmile

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Visvanath Ratnaweera
Re: How best to introduce teachers to Moodle (WAS Moodle test pilot failure)
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers
Helen

Do you mean teachers in general or the teachers in Jean Michel's school? I doubt whether the former could be discussed in one single thread.

Another thing: What about the fundamental question I raised, the question of *why* Moodle or any other LMS?
https://moodle.org/mod/forum/discuss.php?d=215087#p937031. Shouldn't that go before the *how*?
wink
 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Jean Michel
Re: How best to introduce teachers to Moodle (WAS Moodle test pilot failure)
 
I agree you're proposal, Mary. And now, the silly question of the day... how can I change the name of this thread or I don't have capabilities for that?
 
Average of ratings: -
Mary Cooch
Re: How best to introduce teachers to Moodle
Group Documentation writersGroup Moodle Course Creator Certificate holdersGroup Moodle HQGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup TestersGroup Translators
Not a silly question at all - when we type a new post we all have the possiblity of changing the subject title in the Subject box above this message box. We can make changes for half an hour so it's too late for you to change your original title -but I think it's good to leave it as it is to show the progression of the thread. If people want to continue contributing they can perhaps use this title instead.
 
Average of ratings: -
Just wondering . . .
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

Yes, shift it if you can Mary. As long as Jean knows.
@Doug, I agree with you of course.  The challenge with your approach is that it takes time and money. The old triangle: fast, good, cheap, PICK two. It seems like in Jean's case Time is the issue.

I'm soon to try out an experimental workshop with mainly High School teachers.  I'm going to CC the workshop booklets sometime.  I've pasted in the outline below.  This is due to some very patient teachers in a few schools I worked with in 2010-2012 and a previous incarnation of trying to have an 'Experience Of Moodle First', then to go on to design/build and hit the keys.  I would have used "activity design" in my title, but this can have a confusion with Moodle's definition of "activity"


Learning pathway design with Moodle 2.2 and 2.3 - a hands on workshop

Aim: for participants to design or adapt learning pathways using Moodle activities and resources to support specific student learning aims. Moodle is based around Courses containing Sections which are populated with Activities and Resources. A learning pathway as we use the idea here is a cluster of activities and resources to support some learning. 

Pre‐requisites: knowledge of a few basics about Moodle:

  1. Navigation: getting in and out, the concept of a Section, the Course settings.
  2. Building in Moodle: how to add/move/delete//edit items i n Moodle (using the Activity chooser and the File picker)
  3. Forums: what a forum is and how to make a post, using the editor (eg inserting a link, adding images, formatting text)
  4. Files: how to add a file to a Moodle section.

You will also need to join in and make at least one post in the workshop course forum.

If any of the pre‐requisites are a problem, then feel free to come to the workshop a little earlier and we will get you up to speed.

Workshop outline

An initial presentation will cover:

  1. Four key habits for success with e‐teaching in a blended course using Moodle: helping students engage.
  2. Activity design and creation (implementation) in Moodle: marks of a ‘good’ Moodle course.

The hands on part. We will look at some designs in Moodle to achieve specific outcomes with our classes. Quality designs of this sort should be easy to set up, they should save time and improve learning.

Such possible aims:

  1. Provide quality formative assessment for students that does NOT use a lot of teacher time
  2. Supporting students inn a long term project.
  3. Peer assessment
  4. Exam preparation
  5. Supporting skill building in students
  6. . . or one of your own

We will choose one, maybe two off this list and consider some simple designs using just a few Moodle tools to achieve them.

Notes: This will not be a workshop covering “Everything cool you can do with Moodle”. It aspires to help with a stronger link between an aim in your teaching (and only quite a narrow aim for the purposes of this workshop) and a simple deployment in Moodle.
Length of time: Trying to put this in one session is a little bit experimental. We are unsure of the best length of time, and our initial guess is a good two hours.

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Stan Counsell
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

Derek, Hi

Over the past weekor two I have been cursing the volume of e-mails 'Using Moodle' but this response justifies them all.

I am a Moodle novice (too old to be classed as any sort of virgin) and until I get up and running and transfer what was going to be a web based course I will be chief cook and bottle washer - so your item has given me some inspiration.

Thanks

Stan

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Doug Moody
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

I have been watching this thread and only have one short comment...

Human nature being what it is, you should capitalize on our nature.

Basically, instead of trying to "push" this technology, why not make tham WANT it? In other words, you SHOW them how it can solve hard problems by showing what others have done with it.

If you do a good job in that, then they will endure all sorts of difficulty in order to make it happen in your school. Do NOT mandate it, SELL it! Once you do, they will be coming to you begging for your halp to do it like they saw it done. Before long, you will be the hero, not the one who is FORCING them.

Good luck.

 
Average of ratings: -
Picture of Jean Michel
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
 

Well ... good news smile

Head teacher thinks it's worth to do a second pilot test with the teachers, to be able to judge as much impartially as possible the goodness of Moodle.The key for the successfull will be the platform adoption of a group of teachers who are not familiar with new technologies in general (they are over 50 years old in average), so It's hard for them to dive into Moodle, because they're used to their traditional lessons: blackboad, piece of chalk, book and homework. This is the people who it's more difficult to be persuaded for me.

Now, we are going to try to extract a "positive feedback" from teachers during three weeks. 

I'll try to summarize their reports the sooner I can, to let you know about that.

Thanks to all, you really help me!. And I hope you continue like that ;)

 

Jean

 
Average of ratings:Useful (1)
Mary Cooch
Re: Moodle Test Pilot Failure: Teachers don't like it!
Group Documentation writersGroup Moodle Course Creator Certificate holdersGroup Moodle HQGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup TestersGroup Translators

Thanks so much for keeping us informed. And don't worry about the over 50s  - I am over 50 and a fair number in our school are over 50 and they like and use Moodlesmile

 
Average of ratings: -