General help

 
 
Picture of Doug Smith
your preferred type of resource?
 

Hi,

I've been developing some modules/courses for secondary school science. For presenting content with resources, I've used both "File" and "Page" for the content. Right now my modules are mostly HTML pages that I uploaded (ie "File"), along with styling that fits nicely with the theme. The advantage of using "File" is that it allowed me to use a single stylesheet that controlled all of the different modules. However, the downside to this is that it is more troublesome to edit a module because the html file needs to be modified offline and then uploaded again.

I'm curious as to what other high school teachers do when adding resources? html pages, uploading files, rich text with minimal styling, etc.

An example of one of modules can be found at http://www.dryfly.ca/school/

Check out Mr. Smith's Physics 11, and maybe the Intro to Kinematics for an example.

Any input on what method of resource to move forward with is appreciated.

thanks

 
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Picture of Paul Ganderton
Re: your preferred type of resource?
 

Hi Doug,

Firstly, loved the design on your site - very inviting for students IMHO. Now, in my experience I tend to use files rather than pages for a number of reasons:

a) in my experience, web pages built in Moodle can be clunky and not always the easiest to edit (of course if I could code native html it would help!!).

b) when you delete a link for a file, the file remains but I've found that the webpages made in Moodle are deleted.

So, I tend to use files (Word, Excel etc as well as Dreamweaver). You control the design and small slips don't result in the loss of your work.

Hope that helps.

Paul

 
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Picture of AL Rachels
Re: your preferred type of resource?
Group DevelopersGroup Particularly helpful MoodlersGroup Testers

Hi Doug,

Like Paul, I really like the design of your site too. I probably would like it even more if I taught physics big grin because then I would have someone to collaborate with, possibly.

I teach computer applications to seventh and eighth graders and I mostly tend to use a combination of five things: quizzes, forums, wikis, lessons, and multiple upload assignments.

  • I have multiple question banks about the different software programs I teach so I can whip up a test very rapidly. I use a combination of pre and post tests as well as a daily, ten question, random quiz about the current subject.
  • I use the forums when I want students to provide narrative input such as essays. When they are forums for student grades, I do the grading. When they are forums for developing stories for the school newspaper, I let the students rate each other's writing and make recommendations for story changes.
  • I use wikis extensively: 372 of them the last time I looked. I use these for all my step-by-step directions that teach students how to use the various applications programs that I teach. It makes it very easy for them to work at their own pace. I especially like using wikis because it is so easy to rapidly change/edit a page and does not require any other software or uploading like you need for making webpages. It's also very easy to make them look very similar to regular webpages. For instance I just tried, and it only took a few minutes to reproduce one of your pages that has a picture of a cheetah and Galileo on it.
  • I use lessons in two ways: (1) for lessons that require the students to read and comprehend, a self-paced lesson can be set up with questions that will check their comprehension, and loop them back through sections they don't understand the first time through, (2) lessons can also be set up as random quizzes (timed/or not) using multiple choice questions from my question bank. We use these for practice for quizzes and as an aid in retaining essential information about course material.
  • The multiple upload assignments are used to provide links to the wiki directions and also provides a place for the student to upload the files that he/she creates for turn in for grading.

To me, the biggest advantage of using these built-in Moodle modules, is I can work from any computer, any where, that has Internet access without having to worry about that computer having a webpage editor/publisher or any other office type application such as a word processor, etc.

Now, if they just get Moodle 2.0 so fixed so that it will automatically update all my wikis. Right now – it's still a no go. Looks like I'll still be using Moodle 1.9.10 for a while.

 
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Tomaz Lasic
Re: your preferred type of resource?
Group Testers

Fantastic use of Moodle Al, well done !!!

Interested in joining a group of people creating School Demo and the community benefiting from some of this great work you do (I know I would love to see things your mention...) ? If so, here is the place for you or anyone else interested, some great names working away there already.

Oh, and the 'get Moodle 2.0 fixed to automatically update' I take it you are referring to http://tracker.moodle.org/browse/MDL-25501 - Upgrade fails for wikis with the same title ? Working on it, I share a desk with the person trying to fix it. Small world hey ? wink

Regards

 

 
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Art Lader
Re: your preferred type of resource?
Group Documentation writers

My go-to resource is the forum.

No doubt about it.

- Art

 
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Judy
Re: your preferred type of resource?
 

I have been using forums because they are the fastest way I can engage students in discussions.   I still need screencast training on how to use the other features of Moodle---I am such a visual learner.  At this point,   preparing other resources seems daunting.

If anyone has these resources down to a science, it would be great to view a possible training video using a screencast like Screencast-O-Matic.

Another reason I have liked forums is the immediate email copy when I opt to subscribe.  It gives me an opportunity to catch kids while they are online and send them a quick hello.

 
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Picture of John Andrewartha
Re: your preferred type of resource?
Group Particularly helpful Moodlers

Hi Judy,

Its horses for courses.  Age, subject blended, open or distance?    Which is you brand?

You might like to join us at Mt Orange, there is a enormous wealth of talent and experience working on this demo.

 
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Picture of Randy Orwin
Re: your preferred type of resource?
 

Hi Doug,

I have actually created most of my stuff directly in Moodle using pages or better yet the wonderful Book module which is a multi-page tool with a table of contents etc.. I don't have problems losing pages as I either just hide them or move them to another section that isn't visible to students. As far as other resources and activities I use the Database activity a lot, the Glossary activity a lot and as already pointed out the Forum activity as well.

A while back I helped a science teacher use Moodle in kind of a neat way. He always has his students do papers on the organs of the human body. Of course the students always want to report on the same three or four organs. Problem solved with the Choice activity where each organ was listed as a choice and set so that only one person could select a given organ. Students were told it was a first come, first served event and there was a scramble to see who could get the organ that they wanted. Once the organs were selected using the Choice activity the papers were written using the Glossary activity. Papers were to include images, video and such to make it a really nice multimedia presentation. After the papers were completed another Glossary was put into play that asked students to use the Moodle GIFT question import format to create three questions from their presentation to be included on the unit exam on the organs of the body. The Glossary was set to be approved before anybody could see the questions so that students didn't see the questions. The teacher exported the glossary, cleaned it up in OpenOffice and then imported the file as a Quiz bank. He then gave the test using questions that students created and the study materials were the papers that students had created in the other Glossary.

Another great science idea is using the Database activity to create a big notebook for collecting data from experiments. This allows for all the data collected to be aggregated in the same place. After the lab is done students can download the spreadsheet and do analysis. Works really well.

Hope this helps.

 
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Picture of Doug Smith
Re: your preferred type of resource?
 

Hi Randy, I had never heard of the Book Module before, I'm going to look into it!

 

thanks

 
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Picture of Dan McGuire
Re: your preferred type of resource?
 

Since I teach 3rd and 4th graders, I use a lot of Assignments, online text with multiple submissions enabled, and Databases.

I've found that the database provides much of the same functionality as the forum but with more structure.  For instance, I use separate fields for author, setting, characters, story problems, and solutions, etc.  Then ask students to comment on their peer's submissions of reading log entries.

The assignment with multiple submissions is essential for teaching writing; I use comments and revisions.  I tried the Workshop, and even with it fixed up beautifully by David Mudrak, it's still overkill for my guys.

And, Yes, Tomaz, I'll get the examples on Mt Orange; soon, I hope.

 
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Picture of Tom Harold
Re: your preferred type of resource?
Group Moodle Course Creator Certificate holders

Hi Dan,

I work in Darwin, Australia and we are just getting going with Moodle. I am particularly interested in how you use the database for your level 4 5 students. Would you be able to take a screen capture of what it looks like to show me? I will then be able to suggest it to teachers of that level within our system. I didn't realise it was usable for that purpose and it sounds really good.

Cheers

Tom

 
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Picture of Dan McGuire
Re: your preferred type of resource?
 

Tom,

Here's a copy of what a single record view looks like.  I'm the creator (name field) of this entry.  This is a starter example.  After most students get this much down, I then coach them to expand each field entry. For instance, requiring three sentences in each entry.

Below the single record view is a view of the field setup

23 November 2009



Dan
Book Title: Hoot
Book author: Carl Hiaasen
Characters (Main and Supporting): Roy - a boy who has just moved to a small town in Florida.
Beatrice - a tough girl in Roy's school
Mullet Fingers - Beatrice's brother
Setting: A Small town in Florida
Problems in the Story: There are lots of problems, but one of the main ones is how to stop a Pancake House from being built on a lot that is the home for some Burrowing Owls.
Solutions to the Problems in the Story:

We haven't quite gotten to the end, yet, but ...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Field nameField typeField descriptionAction
Date date Date
Edit Delete
name text Text
Edit Delete
Book Title text Text
Edit Delete
Book author text Text
Edit Delete
Characters (Main and Supporting) textarea Textarea
Edit Delete
Setting textarea Textarea
Edit Delete
Problems in the Story textarea Textarea
Edit Delete
Solutions to the Problems in the Story textarea Textarea
Edit Delete
Book Level text Text
Edit Delete
Record number number Number enter the next number Edit Delete
 
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